The Irish Mob is boss. That is all.

Feeling creative? Want to show your love for the Mob? Do both in one go - check out the Mr/Ms Mob 2010 competition!
Don't forget to visit our chatbox for some random chatter about nothing in particular.
Invite all your friends! Invite everyone you could ever know!
Help us continue our story 6 words at a time here.

    Creating your investigator

    Share
    avatar
    Griggle990
    You are tearin' me apart!
    You are tearin' me apart!

    Posts : 101 Join date : 2010-12-06

    Creating your investigator

    Post by Griggle990 on Wed Feb 23, 2011 2:26 pm

    Blank Investigator Sheet Front

    Blank Investigator Sheet Back

    The Call of Cthulhu 6th Edition Core Book

    1. Determine Characteristics
    Find a blank investigator sheet. Be sure it is for the right era of play. Write your name in the space on the side.

    • Ro1l 3D6 once each for the Characteristics STR, CON, POW, DEX, and APP. Enter tht results on
      the investigator sheet ,in the appropriate spaces. Use a pencil. Wrile lightly enough that you can erase.

    • Roll 2D6+6 once each for SIZ and INT. Enter the results.

    • Roll 3D6+6 for the characteristic EDU. Enter the result.

    • SAN equals POW x5. Write in that amount.


    These numbers are your investigator's skeleton. Be alert for ways to flesh out your investigator by explaining the numbers you rolled.

    Determine Additional background
    At sometime-it needen't be now-fill in other information on the front side of the investigator sheet. Under the investigator name. write in colleges and degrees if appropriate, and a birthplace.
    • Marks, scars, and mental disorders may come in the course of play.

    • Be sure your name is on the left side of the sheet, not at the top. The top is where your investigator’s name goes.

    • The minimum age for an investigator is EDU+6 years. For each ten years older you make your investigator than that, add a point of EDU and allot an additional 20 occupation points. With maturity comes mortality: for each ten years above age 40, subtract your choice of 1 STR, 1 CON, 1 DEX, or 1 APP.

    The back of the investigator’s sheetis mostly self-explanatory. See the About Investigators chapter, “Reverse Side of the Sheet” (p. 50).

    Investigator Yearly Income and Property
    Select the appropriate era of play—1890s, 1920s, or Present.

    For the 1890s, roll 1D10: a result of 1 = $500 + room & board, 2 = $1000, 3 = $1500; 4 = $2000, 5 = $2500, 6 = $3000, 7 = $4000, 8 = $5000, 9 = $5000, 10 = $10,000.

    For the 1920s, roll 1D10: a result of 1 = $1500 + room & board, 2 = $2500, 3 + 4 = $3500, 5 = $4500, $6 = 5500, 7 = $6500, 8 = $7500, 9 = $10,000, 10 = $20,000.

    For the Present, roll 1D10: a result of 1 = $15,000, 2 = $25,000, 3 = $35,000, 4 = $45,000, 5 = $55,000, 6 = $75,000, 7 = $100,000, 8 = $200,000, 9 = $300,000, 10 = $500,000.

    The investigator also has property and other assets of value equal to five times yearly income: an investigator in the Present who makes $55,000 has $225,000 in assets. One tenth of that is banked as cash. Another one tenth is in stocks and bonds, convertible in 30 days. The remainder is in old books, a house, or whatever seems appropriate to the character.

    Damage Bonuses
    STR+SIZ DB
    2 to 12 -1D6
    13 to 16 -1D4
    17 to 24 +0
    25 to 32 +1D4
    33 to 40 +1D6
    41 to 56 +2D6
    57 to 72 +3D6
    73 to 88 +4D6
    For each +16 or fraction
    thereof, +1D6 more

    2. Determine Characteristic Rolls
    • In the characteristics box, multiply INT x5 for Idea, POW x5 for Luck, and EDU x5 for Know, and enter the results.
    • Add STR to SIZ, and find the die roll in the Damage Bonus Table nearby. Write in the result for Damage Bonus. The roll may be positive or negative; if none, write in none.
    • Enter the number 99 for 99 minus Cthulhu Mythos. If your investigator gains points in that skill, lower this number by a like amount.

    3. Determine Derived Characteristic Points
    The Hit Points box is directly below the Characteristics & Rolls Box. Add CON + SIZ and divide by 2: round up any fraction. Circle the resulting number in the hit points box. If your investigator loses hit points, mark them off with pencil slashes, which can be erased as the investigator regains hit points. The circled number represents the investigator’s maximum hit points. In the Magic Points box, circle that number equal to POW. If your investigator loses magic points, mark them off with pencil slashes, then erase the slashes as the investigator regains magic points. The circled number is the maximum magic points regenerated. In the Sanity Points box, circle that number equal to SAN. Sanity points rise and fall; use pencil slashes to show their present number. Unless POW changes, SAN will not change. As the investigator accumulates Cthulhu Mythos skill points, black out an equal number of Sanity points, starting with 99 and working down. Blacked out Sanity points are a ceiling into which current Sanity points cannot be increased.

    4. Determine Occupation & Skills
    A. Find the proper era in the Investigator Yearly Income and Property box nearby, and roll 1D10: your investigator has that much money and property. Enter the amounts in the Cash and Property box on the back of the investigator sheet.

    B. Choose an occupation that you find befitting the investigator’s characteristics and income. Choose from the Sample Occupations listed in the About Investigators chapter, or consult w th your keeper and create a new occupation. If you want a specific occupation for which the characteristics are already tuned, see the “Alternate Ways” box on p. 41, and apply one of those methods. Then return here. Multiply the investigator’s EDU by 20, and allot those points only to the eight or so skills listed for the occupation. The skills are found on the front of the investigator sheet. You can have up to 99 points per skill. Hand-to-hand and firearm values are found on the Weapons Table, in the Game System chapter. Write in the pertinent data in the boxes at the bottom of the investigator sheet front.

    C. Multiply the investigator’s INT x10. These are personal interest points, and can increase any skill except Cthulhu Mythos. Add these points to any printed base chances printed on the investigator sheet, and any amounts already in the blanks to the right of the skills. Total the amount for each skill. Allot every point; points unallocated are lost. Weapon skills are found in the Hand-to-Hand and Firearms boxes just below Skills. Not all skills need to be given points. A single skill of 70% or 80% may be much more valuable than two skills of 35% or 40% each.

    5. Determine Weapons
    The Hand-to-Hand Weapons box contains four personal attacks: information about their attacks is found on the Weapons Table, on pp. 64-65. Unless the investigator’s damage bonus is zero, enter it after each weapon’s attack damage in the Hand-to-Hand Weapons box (for instance 1D3+1D4 for the Fist/Punch skill).

    Swords and fists are hand-to-hand weapons; pistols and shotguns are firearms.

    Firearms may be era-dependent. For instance, no M16 assault rifles exist in the 1920s.

    If allotting skill points to firearms, add the points to the appropriate firearm classes (on the front of the investigator sheet) as well as to the particular weapon. For instance, adding 20 points to .38
    Revolver means that weapon is written in as 40% in the Firearms box, that Handgun rises to 40% in the firearms classes just above the Firearms box, and that skill with other handguns (if the investigator obtains them) also rises by twenty percentiles.


    Last edited by Griggle990 on Fri Feb 25, 2011 1:53 pm; edited 5 times in total
    avatar
    Griggle990
    You are tearin' me apart!
    You are tearin' me apart!

    Posts : 101 Join date : 2010-12-06

    Re: Creating your investigator

    Post by Griggle990 on Wed Feb 23, 2011 2:41 pm

    Characteristics

    We refer solely to investigators these remarks apply to every human character important enough to develop, as keepers will understand. To create an investigator, roll the characteristics first. A characteristic is one of nine numbers which summarize investigators. Other matters being equal, it is always better to have higher characteristics than to have lower ones. These numbers may be likened to skeleton and muscles: our bodies are of different sizes and proportions, but all humans have heads, hearts, and so forth. In the game, each characteristic stands for a general aspect of an investigator—his or her intelligence, dexterity, and so on. These identified quantities help determine the relative value and capability of investigators, and suggest ways for them to act and react during roleplaying. A player makes random rolls for characteristics for the same sort of reason that tennis players use a tennis net—context creates meaning. Characteristics rarely increase after being rolled, because investigators are created as adults and have finished growing. Characteristics do occasionally decrease as a consequence of magical or physical injury. Though a suggestion is included for each characteristic, the effect of 0 or a low value in a characteristic is mostly left for the keeper to describe. It should be suitable to the current situation and apt in tone—horrible, grievous, or funny. Such a loss is always a blow to the investigator. As an identity rounds into a full personality, every player shares in the pleasure, and the meshing of the various investigators takes on life and becomes good drama.

    STR (Strength)
    Strength measures the muscle power of investigators. Use it to judge how much they can lift, or push or pull, or how tightly they can cling to something. This characteristic is important in determining the damage investigators do in hand-to-hand combat. Reduced to Strength 0, an investigator is an invalid, unable to leave his or her bed.
    CON (Constitution)
    This compares health, vigor, and vitality. Constitution also helps calculate how well investigators resist drowning or suffocation. Poisons and diseases may directly challenge investigator Constitutions. High-CON investigators often have higher hit points, the better to resist injury and attack. Serious physical injury or magical attack might lower CON. If Constitution reaches 0, the investigator dies.
    SIZ (Size)
    The characteristic SIZ averages height and weight into one number. To see over something, to squeeze through a small opening, or even to judge whose head might be sticking up out of the grass, use Size. Size helps determine hit points and the damage bonus. One might decrease SIZ to indicate loss of several limbs, though lowering DEX is more often the solution. Presumably if investigators lose all SIZ, they disappear—goodness knows to where.
    INT (Intelligence)
    Intelligence represents how well investigators learn, remember, and analyze, and of how aware they are of that which is around them. To help describe different circumstances, keepers multiply INT times various numerals and then call for D100 rolls equal to or less than the products. INT x5—the Idea roll—is especially popular. For more about it, see further below. Difficult concepts, plans, or inspired guesses have lower chances to be derived, and hence get lower multipliers, down to INT x2 or INT x1. Such rolls can establish whether or not an investigator makes a deduction or links information, avoiding the question of the player deducing (for instance) that the presence of a volcano argues that a world has a molten core. An investigator without INT is a babbling, drooling idiot. Intelligence determines the number of personal interest skill points allotted to a new investigator, and also how quickly an investigator can learn a Cthulhu Mythos spell. If the amount of Intelligence seems to contradict a characteristic rolled later, that’s another chance for roleplaying: an investigator with high EDU and low INT, for instance, might be a pedantic teacher or a sideshow performer, someone who knows facts but not their meanings. Conversely, high INT and low EDU might mean ignorance—a farm boy or poor immigrant, new to the Big City—but this person would not be dull-witted.
    POW (Power)
    Power indicates force of will. The higher the POW, the higher the aptitude for magic. Power does not quantify leadership, which is a matter for roleplaying. The amount of Power or the number ofmagic points (they derive from Power) measure resistance to magical or hypnotic attack. An investigator without POW is zombie-like and unable to use magic. Unless stated otherwise, lost POW is lost permanently. POW x5 is the Luck roll, about which see further below. That amount also equals a character’s initial SAN characteristic. Magic points, unlike Power, are spent and regenerated. The POW of ordinary characters rarely changes. One who is adroit in the magic of the Cthulhu Mythos may be able to increase personal POW. Keepers especially are referred to the boxed text titled How Sorcerers Get That Way, on p. 101, near the end of the Magic chapter.
    DEX (Dexterity)
    Investigators with higher Dexterity scores are quicker, nimbler, and more physically flexible. A keeper might call for a DEX roll in order to grab a support to keep from falling, to stay upright in high winds or on ice, to accomplish some delicate task, or to take something without being noticed. As with the other characteristics, the difficulty of the roll depends on the multiplier which the keeper selects for the characteristic. An investigator without DEX is uncoordinated, unable to perform physical tasks without also receiving a successful Luck roll. In combat, the character with the higher DEX hits or fires first, and thus may be able to disarm or disable an opponent before the foe can attack. DEX x2 determines the starting percentage of
    investigator Dodge skills.
    APP (Appearance)
    Appearance shows attractiveness and friendliness. Some multiple of APP might be useful in social encounters, or when trying to make an initial impression on a member of the opposite sex, perhaps in conjunction with a Fast Talk or Bargain roll. Appearance is a surface characteristic, however: initial impressions are not necessarily lasting. APP measures what one sees in the mirror, not ongoing personal leadership or charisma. An investigator without APP is appallingly ugly, provoking comment
    and shock everywhere.
    EDU (Education)
    Education measures formal and factual knowledge possessed by the investigator, as well as the number of years it took him or her to learn that material. EDU measures information, not intelligent use of information. EDU partly determines how many skill points an investigator has. And EDU x5 is the Know roll, about which see further below. EDU x5 also represents the investigator’s starting percentage with the skill Own Language. An investigator without EDU would be like a newborn baby, or an amnesiac without knowledge of the world, probably curious and credulous. An EDU score of 12 suggests a high school graduate. More than that indicates a person with some college years. EDU greater than 16 indicates some graduate-level work or degree. An investigator with a high Education may not be schooled, but still might be studious and observant. See also the spread for Creating Your Investigator, on pp. 36-37.
    SAN (Sanity)
    Find Sanity by multiplying POW x5. Sanity is derived, but it is crucial to investigators and central to the idea of this game. Anentire chapter in this section is devoted to Sanity: it distinguishes between the SAN characteristic, Sanity points, and maximum Sanity. Sanity points fluctuate. Characteristic SAN does not change. An investigator’s maximum of Sanity points is never more than 99. Sanity points of 99 represent the strongest possible mind, one capable of deflecting or lessening even extreme emotional shocks. On the other hand, 30 Sanity points would indicate a more fragile mind, one which might be driven into temporary or permanent madness. Most Mythos monsters and some natural events cost Sanity points to encounter, and Mythos spells cost Sanity points to learn and to cast. An investigator’s Sanity points are never more than 99 minus current Cthulhu Mythos percentiles. Up to that maximum, it is possible to regain Sanity points lost, or even to increase Sanity points above the original total, but that process is slow.
    avatar
    Griggle990
    You are tearin' me apart!
    You are tearin' me apart!

    Posts : 101 Join date : 2010-12-06

    Re: Creating your investigator

    Post by Griggle990 on Wed Feb 23, 2011 3:17 pm

    Sample Occupations

    An occupation is a way to explain the skills that a character has. Any number of occupations exist. Those important in Lovecraft’s stories are asterisked. The occupations presented here offer some ideas about character formation. If creating a new occupation, it is best to confine the number of skills to eight or fewer, or the notion behind an occupation, that of concentrated skills, quickly becomes pointless. Most occupations can be applied to the three eras without change, but Hackers and Spokespersons exist only in our interesting times.

    *ANTIQUARIAN—Art, Bargain, Craft, History, Library Use, Other Language, Spot Hidden, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    ARTIST—Art, Craft, Fast Talk, History, Photography, Psychology, Spot Hidden, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    ATHLETE—Climb, Dodge, Jump, Martial Arts, Ride, Swim, Throw, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    *AUTHOR—History, Library Use, Occult, Other Language, Own
    Language, Persuade, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    CLERGYMAN—Accounting, History, Library Use, Listen, Other
    Language, Persuade, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    CRIMINAL—Bargain, Disguise, Fast Talk, Handgun, Locksmith, Sneak, Spot Hidden, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    *DILETTANTE—Art, Craft, Credit Rating, Other Language, Ride, Shotgun, any two other skills as personal or era specialties.

    *DOCTOR OF MEDICINE—BiologyCredit Rating, First Aid, Latin, Medicine, Pharmacy, Psychoanalysis, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    DRIFTER—Bargain, Fast Talk, Hide, Listen, Natural History, Psychology, Sneak, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    ENGINEER—Chemistry, Electrical Repair, Geology, Library Use, Mechanical Repair, Operate Heavy Machine, Physics, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    ENTERTAINER—Art, Credit Rating, Disguise, Dodge, Fast Talk, Listen, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    FARMER / FORESTER—Craft, Electrical Repair, First Aid,
    Mechanical Repair, Natural History, Operate Heavy Machine, Track, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    HACKER / CONSULTANT—Computer Use, Electrical Repair,
    Electronics, Fast Talk, Library Use, Other Lang-uage, Physics, any one other skill as a personal specialty.

    *JOURNALIST—Fast Talk, History, Library Use, Own Language, Persuade, Photography, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    LAWYER-Bargain, Credit Rating, Fast Talk, Law, Library use, Persuade, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    MILITARY OFFICER—Accounting, Bargain, Credit Rating, Law, Navigate, Persuade, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    MISSIONARY—Art, Craft, First Aid, Mechanical Repair, Medicine, Natural History, Persuade, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    MUSICIAN—Art, Bargain, Craft, Fast Talk, Listen, Persuade, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    PARAPSYCHOLOGIST—Anthropology, History, Library Use, Occult, Other Language, Photography, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    PILOT—Astronomy, Electrical Repair, Mechanical Repair, Navigate, Operate Heavy Machine, Physics, Pilot, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    *POLICE DETECTIVE—Bargain, Fast Talk, Law, Listen, Persuade, Psychology, Spot Hidden, any one other skill as a personal or era
    specialty. POLICEMAN—Dodge, Fast Talk, First Aid, Grapple, Law, Psychology, and any two of the following as a personal specialty: Bargain, Drive Automobile, Martial Arts, Ride, or Spot Hidden.

    PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR—Bargain, Fast Talk, Law, Library Use, Locksmith, Photography, Psychology, and any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    *PROFESSOR—Bargain, Credit Rating, Library Use, Other
    Language, Persuade, Psychology, and any two of the following as a personal specialty: Anthropology, Archaeology, Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Electronics, Geology, History, Law, Medicine, Natural History, or Physics.

    SOLDIER—Dodge, First Aid, Hide, Listen, Mechanical Repair, Rifle, Sneak, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    SPOKESPERSON—Credit Rating, Disguise, Dodge, Fast Talk,
    Persuade, Psychology, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    TRIBAL MEMBER—Bargain, Listen, Natural History, Occult, Spot Hidden, Swim, Throw, any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.

    ZEALOT—Conceal, Hide, Library Use, Persuade, Psychology, any two of the following (Chemistry, Electrical Repair, Law, Pharmacy, Rifle), and any one other skill as a personal or era specialty.
    avatar
    catalyticCthulhu
    Sad Keanu
    Sad Keanu

    Posts : 48 Join date : 2011-02-02

    Re: Creating your investigator

    Post by catalyticCthulhu on Fri Feb 25, 2011 12:33 am

    Awesome info man.. I loves me some Cthulhu mythos..

    The blank investigator sheet has a watermark that comes full bolded blocking the whole sheet, though :/
    avatar
    Griggle990
    You are tearin' me apart!
    You are tearin' me apart!

    Posts : 101 Join date : 2010-12-06

    Re: Creating your investigator

    Post by Griggle990 on Fri Feb 25, 2011 1:57 am

    catalyticCthulhu wrote:Awesome info man.. I loves me some Cthulhu mythos..

    The blank investigator sheet has a watermark that comes full bolded blocking the whole sheet, though :/
    Hay thanks for the complement. I checked the sheet and the only watermark I found was a small question mark. But if it is too annoying I will look for a new one.
    avatar
    Griggle990
    You are tearin' me apart!
    You are tearin' me apart!

    Posts : 101 Join date : 2010-12-06

    Re: Creating your investigator

    Post by Griggle990 on Fri Feb 25, 2011 11:04 am

    Notes on Occupations

    These entries correspond to some of the investigator occupations listed nearby. They might help define new investigators or other characters. Some have more history or sociology in them than description, but that may help orient you as well. Though a few might more likely occur in one era than another, most of these stereotypes pass easily between eras. If you wish, you may combine elements of two sketches to form a more interesting or more complex investigator. These are average people. If you need statistics immediately, choose from among the sample ready-to-play investigators at the back of this book. Most of the entries below have been cast in male form, since earlier eras would demand the masculine form, but the probability of female equivalents is also given. Selected Occupations

    ANTIQUARIAN—he revels in the timeless excellence of design and execution, and in the power of ancient lore, the most Lovecraft-like occupation. The antiquarian rarely deals in what he loves. More often, an independent income allows him to sharpen and define his pleasure in things old and obscure. He has an appreciative eye and a swift mind, and frequently finds mordant or contemptuous humor in the foolishness of the ignorant, the pompous, and the greedy—or are those perceptions clues to his own mental instability? Occasionally female, though usually too obsessive and voyeuristic to be of that sex.

    ARTIST—he is self-absorbed with his own visions, but is blessed with a talent that lets him express himself. Often he also has a crafty entrepreneurial streak. Usually a painter or sculptor but, by the present day, academic infusions have so enwrapped the fine arts that technique has become less important than concept or the ability to write a grant proposal. Talented or not, the artist’s ego must be hardy and strong to surmount initial obstacles and to keep him working if success arrives. This occupation is equally available to males and females.

    AUTHOR—as distinct from the journalist, the author uses words to define and explore the conditions of human life, and especially the range of human emotions. It is said that an author does not so much write as rewrite; his labors are solitary and his rewards solipsistic: only a relative handful make much money in the present day, though in previous eras the trade once provided livable wages. The work habits of authors vary widely. Typically an author withdraws during periods of intense creation. The author who is constantly expansive and sociable is written-out, or perhaps had no talent to start with.
    May be male or female.

    Dilettante-has so much money that specialists are needed to take care of it. He or she is well educated, though not systematically educated or necessarily accomplished in anything. Money frees the dilettante to be eccentric and outspoken. He or she has had plenty of time to learn how to be charming and sophisticated; what else has been done with that time betrays the dilettante’s true character. Lacking financial compulsion, his or her family relations are sometimes very odd. Can be male or female.

    DOCTOR OF MEDICINE—perhaps a general practitioner, a surgeon or other specialist, a psychiatrist, or (especially in the 1890s and 1920s) an independent medical researcher. Apart from personal goals, three aims—helping patients, gaining money and prestige, and promoting a more rational and wiser society—are common to the occupation. Doctors tend to be self-sufficient sorts for whom families become adjuncts to respectability. A successful practice requires dedication and much time. May be male or female. By the present day female physicians are no longer unusual.

    DRIFTER—as opposed to someone who is poverty-stricken, the drifter’s wandering life is chosen, perhaps compensating for social, philosophical, sexual, or economic lacks. The drifter takes jobs, sometimes for months, but he is disposed to solve problems with the answer of mobility and isolation, not comfort and intimacy. The life of the road might seem especially American, but the same sort of life is chosen wherever travel itself is not systematically dangerous. Because the road can be perilous and is without organized protection, the drifter is often male.

    ENTERTAINER—this occupation might include dancer, singer, juggler, athlete, musician, or anyone else who earns a living in front of an audience. These people love to be seen, love to show what they do best, and love the consequent applause. These proclivities can be observed in children as young as age three or four, but the talent that reaps success may lie fallow for years. Show-business families make excellent incubators. May be male or female. This profession is not often respectable in the 1890s, but the money which Hollywood stars make in the 1920s changes most minds, and by the present day such a background is generally felt to be an advantage.

    JOURNALIST—uses words to report and comment upon topics and incidents of the day, writing as many words in a day as an author may in a week. Journalists work for newspapers, magazines, and radio and television news services. The best report, but keep themselves independent of the corruption and self-serving they witness. That reality overwhelms the worst, who eventually forfeit any sensibility except the power of their words. Nearly always male in earlier eras, interchangeably male or female by the present day.

    MISSIONARY—has accepted the call to spread the word of God. May be independent of all except his or her own vision, or may bebacked by some organization to do just that—and in that case has demonstrated some ability to perform such duties. The clear-sighted missionary is able to focus on the humanity of converts and does not confuse alien customs with human souls, so that questions of dress, behavior, or diet do not become paramount. Where morality leaves off and religion begins is by no means clear. This occupation requires settled emotions and a sense of humor. The successful missionary remains personally humble and exalts god. Christian and Islamic proselytizers are encountered worldwide in all the eras, as are certain other sects, and as are Buddhist and Hindu teachers in the 1920s and the present. The missionary is of either sex.

    PARAPSYCHOLOGIST—prestigious universities grant no degrees for parapsychology. Standards in the field are based entirely upon personal reputation, and so the most acceptable representatives tend to hold degrees in related areas—physics, psychology, or medicine. Who chooses this study is unusually sympathetic to the notion of invisible mystical powers, and in validating that belief to the satisfaction of physical scientists. This would represent an unusual cohabitation of faith and doubt—the parapsychologist may have difficulty separating the conflicting desires. A person uninterested in observation, experiment, and proof is not a scientist, though he or she may be an occultist.

    POLICE DETECTIVE—though present day detectives may attend police science classes, take a degree, and undergo special training and endless civil service exams, police detectives of every era are grounded in their experiences as junior officers and ordinary patrolmen. Police routine and discipline becomes vital to self-identification as well as an ongoing source of frustration as the detective is tempted by extralegal shortcuts to successful arrests. The police detective may be a manager who coordinates staff in some important investigation, but rarely has the luxury of concentrating on a single case. In the United States, his responsibilities at any one time may number in the dozens or hundreds of open cases. The detective’s crucial function is to marshal enough evidence to allow an arrest, in turn leading to a successful criminal prosecution. Detectives everywhere sort truth from lies by evidence and reconstruction. The offices of detective and prosecutor are everywhere separate, so that the evidence may be weighed independently before trial. More recently in the United States, women have become detectives, but the profession before then was almost exclusively male.

    PRIVATE EYE—in most places the private investigator is licensed by the police and must be privately bonded as well, guarantees of minimal honesty. Proven malfeasance costs him his license and puts him out of business. The private eye usually acts in non-police situations: he gathers information and evidence for private clients in impending civil cases, tracks down fleeing spouses or business partners, or acts as an agent for private defense attorneys in criminal cases. In detective classics, the private eye is hired to handle some ordinary civil or private matter (such as a cheating spouse), and then is drawn into the investigation of a murder or series of murders as the case unfolds. Like any professional, the private eye separates his personal feelings from the job at hand, and works for the guilty and innocent alike, is long as his fee is paid. The private investigator is usually shown to have been a member of a police force in the past, using those connections to his advantage in the present. Usually he is not prosperous and never has known much money, but his private code and keen awareness purifiy his manners. Depending on state or on local law, police experience may not be necessary. A higher proportion of women act as private eyes than as police detectives.

    PROFESSOR—for the most part the occupation indicates a Ph.D. That rank can earn tenure at universities around the world. He is qualified to teach and to perform competent research, and has a discernible academic reputation in his area of expertise. He may be an absolute idiot in other fields, of course, and such contradictory investigators are fun to play. Unless they are of independent means, and have taken leave of their universities, professor-investigators tend to be tethered close to home by their ongoing responsibilities to school and students. Indiana Jones was lucky to have a department head who would allow extended absences—your investigator may not have such an understanding boss. A small minority of female scholars existed in each era, but even in the present day male bastions such as Engineering exist in which female academics are rare.

    TRIBAL MEMBER—in the sense of family allegiance, at least, tribalism is everywhere. In a tribe the primacy of kinship and custom is selfevident. A tribal group is relatively small. In place of a blanket of law and general individual rights, the tribal personality defers to personal honor. Allegiance to the group shines from within. Praise, vengeance, gifts, and glory—all must be personal to him or her, and if leaders or enemies are to be treated as men of honor, they too must be personally known in some way. The notion of “exile” has real power in such a setting. In the United States, the concept of the tribe as a mutual frame of mind developed during the 1960s, and the notion of the urban tribe or even a tribal nation has become more and more synonymous with the sullen friction between the new paganism and active Christian fundamentalism.

    ZEALOT—intense and vision-driven, scorning an easy life, the zealot agitates for a better life for humanity or for some advantage for the group imagined to be the most worthwhile part of humanity. Some promote their beliefs through violence, but the peaceable majority will be just as implacable. All dream of the vindication of their beliefs. The zealot is not typically young or old, and a good chance exists for a female counterpart to the male.
    avatar
    catalyticCthulhu
    Sad Keanu
    Sad Keanu

    Posts : 48 Join date : 2011-02-02

    Re: Creating your investigator

    Post by catalyticCthulhu on Fri Feb 25, 2011 9:30 pm

    Griggle990 wrote:Hay thanks for the complement. I checked the sheet and the only watermark I found was a small question mark. But if it is too annoying I will look for a new one.

    For me there is a giant Cthulhu-esque symbol the size of the entire document... strange.. I am using FoxIt to view it, maybe it works in Adobe for some reason. hmm.. others please check this?
    avatar
    Griggle990
    You are tearin' me apart!
    You are tearin' me apart!

    Posts : 101 Join date : 2010-12-06

    Re: Creating your investigator

    Post by Griggle990 on Mon Feb 28, 2011 4:00 pm

    catalyticCthulhu wrote:
    Griggle990 wrote:Hay thanks for the complement. I checked the sheet and the only watermark I found was a small question mark. But if it is too annoying I will look for a new one.

    For me there is a giant Cthulhu-esque symbol the size of the entire document... strange.. I am using FoxIt to view it, maybe it works in Adobe for some reason. hmm.. others please check this?
    Well I am using Adobe

    Sponsored content

    Re: Creating your investigator

    Post by Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:18 am